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What is Addiction Rehabilitation?

What is Addiction Rehabilitation?

Addiction rehabilitation programs help millions overcome addictions to alcohol and drugs. Rehab can provide healing and sobriety.

Overview

It is estimated that more than twenty-one million Americans over age twelve have a substance use disorder; however, less than ten percent will ever seek or receive treatment. This means ninety percent of people who could benefit from help at a rehab detox center continue to use rather than seek treatment at an addiction rehab center.1

What is Addiction Rehabilitation?

Drug rehabilitation or treatment at an addictions rehab involves working closely with a drug or alcohol rehabilitation counselor to overcome addiction. Trained medical and mental health professionals at a rehab for drug and alcohol addiction will work with you to help you break free from the challenges of drug and alcohol dependency.

Rehabilitation therapy for drug addiction will teach you about the roots of addiction, and specialized drug rehabilitation methods will help you develop new, healthier coping tools to manage triggers after treatment ends.2

Do You Need Addiction Rehabilitation?

There are several situations where you may find greater success in achieving sobriety at a rehabilitation addiction center. Examples include severe addictions, lack of support structure at home, if you have a co-occurring mental or medical health condition or if you have completed rehab for drug addiction and experienced relapse.

Another reason to choose alcohol and drug rehab over getting sober “cold turkey” is the type of substance. Specific substances, including opioids and alcohol, sometimes produce dangerous withdrawal symptoms. When you stop using these drugs suddenly, it can lead to medical emergencies and frequently leads to relapse. In a chemical dependency rehab, providers skilled in detox rehabilitation can help you manage withdrawal symptoms.

Understanding the Addiction Rehab Process

Although each rehabilitation addiction center is unique, there are certain stages of rehab that are present in all rehabilitation and recovery programs. In general, the faces of the rehabilitation process include intake, detox, rehabilitation therapy for drug addiction, and comprehensive aftercare planning.3

Intake: Creating a Customized Care Plan

Typically, the first stage in any drug rehabilitation program is intake. Intake is a crucial step as it involves a series of assessments and interviews with members of your treatment team to help them learn more about your unique treatment needs. Additionally, understanding your current and past relationships with drugs or alcohol can assist your providers in developing an appropriate drug treatment process to help you achieve lasting sobriety.

Detox: Safely Removing Addictive Substances from Your Body

Depending on the nature and severity of your addiction, the next step in addiction rehab treatment is typically detoxification or detox. Detox involves allowing your body to cleanse itself from any remaining substances. Detox is crucial to the alcoholism rehabilitation process and rehab from specific drugs due to the potentially dangerous nature of withdrawal symptoms.

Rehab: Building the Foundation of Long-Term Treatment Efforts

After completing detox, the next stage of substance abuse treatment is the rehabilitation phase or comprehensive therapy. Rehabilitation therapy focuses on teaching you more about the roots of addiction, how to overcome addiction, and developing coping strategies you can use to manage triggers after treatment ends.

Recovery and Aftercare: Continuing Healing for Long-Term Recovery

As your primary treatment program at a rehab for substance abuse ends, you will continue working closely with your treatment team to develop an aftercare program that ensures you have access to ongoing care. Depending on the aftercare program, this may include vocational rehabilitation services, continuing alcohol and drug rehab therapy, and assistance obtaining prescriptions for rehabilitation drugs as part of a medication-assisted treatment (MAT) program.

Types of Addiction Rehab

If you have considered drug rehabilitation in the past, you likely understand that there are different types of alcohol and drug rehab programs. The two most common are inpatient and outpatient centers for rehabilitation and recovery.

Inpatient

In an inpatient rehabilitation program, you will live at the treatment center throughout your rehab addiction treatment program. At an inpatient addiction rehab center, providers are available around the clock to provide care and support when needed. Generally, inpatient rehabs for drug addiction offer programs that last between 30 and 90 days. The intensity and duration of your program will depend on various factors specific to your treatment needs.

Outpatient

Outpatient rehab for drug and alcohol addiction allows you to engage in treatment during the day but live at home throughout treatment. Outpatient programs use drug rehabilitation methods, including group therapy, individual therapy, and peer support groups.

Outpatient rehab for drug addiction does not require you to remain on-site throughout treatment; however, the therapy commitment for outpatient rehab addiction treatment may range from one to five days per week. Outpatient rehabilitation of substance abuse disorders is typically better suited for those with a mild addiction or for whom this is their first time in rehab.

What to Expect from Addiction Rehabilitation

Without care and support from a treatment program, rehabilitation of substance abuse disorders and achieving lasting sobriety can be complex. Rehabs for drug addiction offer several helpful benefits designed to help you safely and effectively overcome addiction while learning how to avoid relapse and remain sober.

What are the Benefits of a Rehabilitation Center?

As previously mentioned, there are many benefits to choosing a rehabilitation center over detoxing and quitting substances without support. These will be detailed below.

Safe Environment

Drug and alcohol detox and rehabilitation programs provide a safe and supportive environment away from potential triggers and threats to your sobriety. Medical and mental health professionals are available throughout the day, and night, to provide care and assistance when needed.

Additionally, the presence of medical professionals throughout detox ensures you can safely and effectively cleanse your system of drugs while focusing on healing your body, mind, and spirit.

Structure

It is often said that boredom is one of the key contributing factors to relapse. It can also be a contributing factor to addiction. Inpatient rehabilitation centers typically have a structured schedule. Patients will wake up and sleep at the same time each day, participate in chores or duties around the “house,” and have scheduled mental health and medical appointments throughout the day. Time is also allotted for leisure, exercise, meditation, and self-care practices.

Stress Management

Some therapy sessions at a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center focus on self-care. These sessions are designed to teach you various stress management and coping tools you can use both during treatment and after faced with challenges to your mental health, physical health, or sobriety.

Exploring Triggers

Triggers are an inevitable part of your day-to-day environment after completing treatment. Triggers are those people, places, or things that remind you of drinking or using. During therapy, you will explore your triggers to understand better how they affect your mental and physical health.

Unfortunately, despite all best efforts, relapse remains widespread for many addicts in recovery. Many who completed a treatment program will experience triggers that lead to relapse. Statistics indicate this number is as high as 60%. Exploring your triggers and learning what to do if relapse occurs is vital to successful addiction treatment.4

Peer Support

Peer support groups are another vital aspect of maintaining sobriety. The peers you meet and interact with during rehab will likely be the same peers you would turn to during recovery when faced with challenging situations.

A group of like-minded peers who share the same sober mindset can be beneficial in preventing relapse by reducing boredom, isolation, and loneliness by providing an outlet for sober activities and engagement.

How Long Does It Take to Recover From Addiction in a Rehabilitation Center?

As with the detox process, the duration of treatment is different for everyone. Several contributing factors will determine the treatment interventions and how long the process will take.

It is important to note that treatment and recovery do not end when you walk out the door of a treatment facility. You will continue receiving treatment and working on your sobriety from intake day through the following weeks, months, and years.

Rehabilitation

Contributing Factors

Some factors that contribute to the length of treatment include the facility you are entering, the severity and duration of your addiction, the nature of your addiction (what you are addicted to), and several others.

The most common treatment program durations are thirty, sixty- and ninety-day. Generally, the longer and more severe the addiction, the longer the treatment process will likely be. This holds even more true when detox is necessary, as the detox process can take up to ten days.

Seeking Treatment

Seeking addiction treatment is vital to your recovery. A recent study showed that people who did not try to get help for their addiction were less likely to make it beyond the three-year mark in sobriety and were more likely to relapse. However, 60% or more of those who did seek help at an addiction rehabilitation program achieved three years or more of lasting sobriety.4

Opportunities for Wellness at Alta Centers

Taking the first steps toward overcoming addiction may seem challenging, but we are here to help. Contact a member of our admissions team today to learn more about addiction rehabilitation at Alta Centers.

Questions About Treatment?

Our knowledgeable team is ready to discuss your situation and options. Your call is confidential with no obligation required.

What is an Intervention?

In a situation involving substance use disorder, planning an intervention may be the best, and safest, option to help someone who is living with an addiction. So, what does intervention mean? An intervention is a strategically planned process of confronting the person who is living with addiction about the consequences of their actions while simultaneously encouraging them to accept help and treatment for their addiction.1

The key feature of an intercession is that while it can be an immensely helpful option in convincing a person that they should seek treatment, it should not be done solely by friends and family members. Without the aid of a specialist, or someone who is equally trained in the process of interventions, an intervention may do more harm than good.

An intervention specialist is someone that has been professionally trained in helping people break free from their addictions. They can help a person without judgment, emotions, or blame to understand how their actions are negatively impacting themselves and those that they care about.

When performed properly, without judgment or pressure, and with the aid of a qualified intercession specialist, 80-90% of substance use interventions are successful in convincing the patient to seek help.

Early Intervention

Treatment is more effective the earlier that it begins for an alcohol or drug abuse disorder. As with any other health condition, early intervention and treatment can prevent more significant problems further on in life.

Unfortunately, in many cases, an alcohol addiction intervention or a drug abuse intercession does not take place until most other options have been exhausted. It can be difficult for those struggling with a substance use disorder to realize or admit that they need help.

It often takes a life-altering event, such as a divorce, loss of employment, or a housing crisis for a person to be willing to seek treatment. Because early
alcohol and drug intercession can be so beneficial, first responders must be able to recognize the symptoms of substance abuse.3

What is a Nursing Intervention?

Nursing interventions are often the first time a patient will experience care for their disorder. It takes place when someone enters a care facility such as a clinic or hospital for a condition that may or may not be caused or exacerbated by their substance use disorder.

After initial evaluation and stabilization, a nurse will take action to help their patient by suggesting healthy physical or emotional coping mechanisms for a patient that wants to quit using the substance that they are addicted to. The nurse will also be able to offer education and information to the patient about other treatment facilities or care providers that can help them on their road to recovery.

Alcohol Intervention

A Further Look at Interventions

Nearly 50% of adults in America regularly drink alcohol, and it is believed that as many as 25% of those Americans have an alcohol addiction, most commonly in the form of binge drinking. In many situations, once a person with an alcohol use disorder realizes the way that alcohol is negatively impacting their life, they can reduce the amount that they drink, or even quit entirely, without outside assistance.

However, some people that have an alcohol use disorder are unable to see how their addiction is negatively affecting them. In this situation, an alcohol use intercession can be extremely beneficial. Some of the benefits of interventions include:

Drug Intervention

A Further Look at Interventions

Over nineteen million adults struggle with a drug abuse disorder and of those, nearly 74% also struggle with a co-existing alcohol abuse disorder. Drug abuse and addiction can be a much harder disorder to recover from than alcohol addiction, particularly due to the high rate of co-use that most people with a substance use disorder experience.

In many cases, suddenly stopping the use of an illicit substance can be just as harmful, if not more so than using the substance itself. The side effects and withdrawal symptoms that a person may experience when they decide to stop using a substance can be severe and at times life-threatening.

Luckily, substance use is a highly treatable disorder and several medications can help a person wean off of illicit substances in a safe, sustained, and monitored manner. A drug abuse intervention can help someone realize that they have options and that they can recover safely and healthily.

Questions About Treatment?

Our knowledgeable team is ready to discuss your situation and options. Your call is confidential with no obligation required.